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Planning Permission To Put Up A Fence

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  • 23-02-2021
Planning Permission To Put Up A Fence

Do I Need Planning Permission to Put Up a Fence?

If you are installing garden fencing on your property, you may be asking: Do I need planning permission to put up a fence? Find out more about when planning permission is required.

When is planning permission required for garden fencing? 

Although you may be able to envision the perfect new fences, gates and garden walls and could be caught up in the excitement of your fencing dreams, it is always important to first check whether you need planning permission to erect the beautiful fence you have in mind. There are various reasons why a fence, wall or gate might need permission, and it is always best to check whether planning permission is required before you begin construction on any new fencing.  

 Here in England, you must apply for planning permission if your fence: 

 If the new fence, wall or gate's height, including trellis, will be greater than 2 metres (6.56 feet) above the ground then planning permission will be required. 

  • If the fence, wall or gate will be next to a highway used by vehicles or the footpath of that highway and will have a height greater than 1 metre (3.28 feet) above the ground, then you will need planning permission.  
  • If your house is a listed building, or within the curtilage of a listed building, any fencing you wish to put up will require planning permission.  
  • If your new fence forms a boundary with or fronts onto a listed building, planning permission will be needed before construction.  
  • If your local planning authority has put an Article 4 direction in place, limiting the development rights in a certain area, any fence, wall or gate you wish to construct will require planning permission dependent on the permitted development in your area.  

 Of course, if the fence, wall or gate you are planning does not fall into these categories, planning permission will not be necessary. It is always best to check with your local authority, such as the parish council, when considering any new fencing. This way, you can be fully aware of any requirements you must adhere to when constructing fences, walls and gates.  

Do I Need Planning Permission to Put Up a Fence?

 Can I add trellis on top of a 6-foot fence? 

While a trellis is a perfect way to add a little decorative height to your new fence, as mentioned before, if you are planning on building a fence to a certain height in a certain location, then you will need to apply for the appropriate planning permission. 

Any fencing including a trellis that exceeds 2 metres in height (6.56 feet) or near a road and/or public footpath and exceeds 1 metre in height(3.28 feet) will need planning permission before construction can begin. 

Therefore if you wish to add a trellis to your fence, and it will be greater than the measurements listed above, you will need to apply for planning permission. These criteria may be different in different areas; therefore, you should take care to check with your local planning authority about whether your fences, gates and garden walls require planning permission or not.

Additionally, it would be best to inform any neighbours whose property will be bordered by the new fencing. This is out of courtesy more than anything and will help you know if your fence could cause future problems.  

How close to the road can you build a fence? 

The rules around fencing and its distance from a road are, at best, vague. In the UK, the legislation guides the height of fencing permitted next to a highway used by vehicles or public footpath. However, it does not exactly define the highway or footpath distance for different heights of fencing. 

It is a general rule that new fences 1 metre away from the road or footpath are limited to 1 metre in height, and any fence that is more than 1 metre from the road may have a height of up to 2 metres tall. Given the vagueness of the legislation, it is always prudent to contact your local planning authority so that you will be able to discuss your new fencing with them and learn the rules surrounding planning permission for fencing and its distance from roads or footpaths in your local area.  

Do I need planning permission for a fence in a Conservation Area?

Much like the UK's legislation surrounding fencing and its distance to roads, the rules regarding planning permission for a fence, wall or gate on Conservation Areas is fairly non-existent. However, you may require planning permission to take down an existing fence, wall, or gate in a Conservation Area, regardless of whether you plan to replace them yourself. 

Again, it is best to mention it to a local authority, in this case, your local Conservation Officer, before carrying out any work so that you may discuss whether you require planning permission for any new fencing when building in a Conservation Area. If you fail to adhere to any rules you are aware of when considering planning permission in a Conservation Area, you may find yourself in a costly legal battle with your local authority.  

Do I need Planning permission to put up fencing on listed buildings?

If you plan to erect a new fence, wall, or gate on your property, and your house is a listed building, you need to apply for planning permission before you begin construction. 

Additionally, if you plan to erect any fencing within the curtilage of a listed building, or even if your fence will form the boundary with a neighbouring property of a listed building, then again you will need permission from your local authority. The curtilage of a listed building is essentially the enclosed area of land surrounding the building. Therefore, if your new fence will front this enclosed land or in fact be placed upon it, then you will need to apply for the relevant planning permission before you undertake any construction.

What happens if I don’t get planning permission for my fencing? 

If you are denied planning permission for your new fencing, for whatever reason, and you decide to go ahead with construction, then you are certainly going to face the consequences. 

If your fence, wall or garden gate does not adhere to the developments permitted by your local authority or has not acquired the relevant planning permission before construction, then your local council may issue an enforcement notice ordering you to take your fencing down. Your local council's enforcement notices may be issued up to 4 years after the date at which the fence, wall or gate was constructed. However, if those 4 years pass without a complaint from your neighbour or your local authority noticing your new fence, it is unlikely that you will face any repercussions. 

It is always best to take the time to speak with your local authority, as well as any neighbours or property owners whose property would be bordered by the new fence, wall or gate, so that you can avoid any stressful situations involving your fencing and apply for planning permission when necessary. It is best to carefully consider your local area's permitted development rights and apply for the proper permission before you begin construction. 


We hope this article has helped you understand more about whether you require planning permission to put up a fence. If you are considering garden fencing for your property within the Suffolk area, get in touch to ask about our fencing services. Find out more about our domestic fencing supplies.